Summer’s End Tomato Crumble

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Every summer around this time, I make a version of this crumble. So much so that I can’t help but get to late-August and start to crave it when I’m inundated with too many tomatoes.

Also every year, we go to the coast for a family reunion over Labor Day weekend. When we get back and September has arrived, the light begins to change dramatically and the fall colors soon set in. So this is the last week of true summer.

 

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And thus it’s a proper time to make a savory dinner crumble, filled up with the season’s best tomatoes and enjoyed on one of these still-long, slow evenings.

 

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Summer’s End Tomato Crumble, serves 4-5
I love to add just a bit of non-dairy cheese to the crumble topping. I think it adds a nice flavor complexity that the otherwise simple ingredients need. Also, I’ve made this so many times and it’s quick and easy to get in the oven, but sometimes corners are cut and I can tell in the result. For instance, fresh herbs really make the seasoning. Use oregano, thyme, or even rosemary, minced quite fine. Add arrowroot flour to the tomato and bean filling if using large slicing tomatoes, but feel free to skip if using smaller cherry varieties. The flour will thicken it up when the tomatoes are extra juicy.

1 1/2 pounds / 700 g ripe tomatoes
1 tsp coarse sea salt
2 tbsp apple cider vinegar
2 cups cooked white beans such as flageolet or small lima beans
1/4 cup arrowroot flour (optional, see notes)

1 1/2 cups / 140 g rolled oats, gluten-free as necessary
6 tbsp almond flour
1/2 cup / 25 g grated vegan parmesan or cheddar cheese (I prefer Vtopian aged cheddar)
4 sprigs fresh oregano or thyme, leaves picked and chopped
1 pinch sea salt
1/4 cup / 55 g coconut oil

  • Preheat the oven to 350°F / 175°C.
  • Rinse the tomatoes and cut in halves if using cherries, or dice if using large slicers. Place in a 9-inch pie pan or baking dish and toss with sea salt, apple cider vinegar white beans, and arrowroot flour if using.
  • Prepare the crumble in a separate bowl. Start by thoroughly mixing oats, almond flour, grated cheese, oregano and salt. Add the coconut oil in small pieces. Use your hands to mix until large crumbs begin to form. Pour the crumble filling evenly over the tomatoes. Bake in the oven for 40 minutes or until the tomato juices are bubbling around the edges and the crumble is firm and browned.

Spanish Salad with Hazelnut + Paprika Dressing

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In the last couple weeks, I’ve had a strong inclination to be more mindful when shopping for food and to put more emphasis on supporting local growers, producers, and processors. Part of this, I think, stems from the recent fires here in the west, and several conversations about a warming climate and how we will have to adapt some of our food and/or growing conditions now and on into the future. I count myself very fortunate to live in an area of the world that is rich in agricultural and ecological diversity, and one in where a strong local food scene is thriving, but I also know the many hands that go into supporting the kind of community I want to live in, and how much consistent work it takes to advocate for a local food system–as well as the flip side of how we rely so much on the status quo with generally no thought to what will happen if… natural disaster, climate change, soil degradation and nutrient depletion, loss of community due to choosing mass-market businesses, etc.

 

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On this topic I’m inspired lately by Andrea’s plan for a locally grown September, and her invitation for others to share in a similar challenge, which I’m structuring in my own way. If you’ve been reading long, or read back into the archives, you’ll know that for me, developing a connection to what is produced locally and in relationship with the producers in my community kick-started and supported me out of my disordered relationship to eating many years ago, and it’s this connection to place and community through food that always assists me when I begin to fall even a little back into old habits.

This salad came about because of my refocus on mindful consuming, using what I have grown and what’s produced nearby, while at the same time taking inspiration from Sara Forte’s Spanish chopped salad in her Bowl + Spoon cookbook.

Before I get there though, this article shares some of the conversations in California (and likely elsewhere) about long-term crop planning and climate change.

And this article, in which I’m interviewed, speaks a little to the impact of our dietary choices on our environment.

Enjoy, or just enjoy this salad. It’s a good one!

 

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Hazelnut + Paprika Spanish Salad
1 small bunch kale, chopped
1 head romaine lettuce, chopped
3-4 cups arugula, torn into small pieces
2-3 green onions, finely diced
1 cup halved cherry tomatoes
1 small, diced apple
1-2 medium cucumbers, diced
1/2 cup cooked lentils
1/4 cup toasted hazelnuts, chopped
2-4 Tbs. parsley, minced

Hazelnut + Paprika Vinaigrette
1 clove garlic
3 Tbs. sherry or wine vinegar
3 Tbs. toasted hazelnuts
3/4 tsp. smoked paprika
2 tsp. honey
2 Tbs. parsley, minced
3 Tbs. extra virgin olive oil
1/2 tsp. sea salt
freshly ground black pepper, to taste
1-2 Tbs. water, to reach desired consistency

  • Blend the vinaigrette ingredients until smooth in a food processor or blender. Add a little water at the end to thin, as necessary.
  • Combine the salad ingredients in a large bowl. Drizzle atop 2/3 to 3/4 of the vinaigrette and toss to coat. Add a little more until you’ve reached your desired dressing level.
  • Serve immediately, while nice and fresh!

israeli spiced tomatoes + pesto beans on toast

israeli spiced tomatoes + pesto beans on toast

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A good longtime friend reminded me recently of all the music we listened to in highschool while driving back country roads home at too fast speeds (and more than likely trying to beat the train). I guess I was often the go-to to for music in those days, and thanks to me thinking my big brother was pretty cool, I swung our listening preferences to the heavy-metal-and-lots-of-it-really-loud most of the time. Prior to that I was a big fan of Britney and all her friends, and now to this day I’ll listen to just about anything if I consider it music but have had We Are Messengers and The Digital Age on repeat for most of the last year. They’re basically my preferred pre-trail run jam.

Oh and Britney. Because she knows how to motivate a girl through a Friday afternoon strength session when nothing else will.

 

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In other ramblings, lately I’m into making weeknight meals a little more time-intensive and switching weekends to simple, easy, and quick. I was accused recently of reverting strongly to my Irish/British roots when it comes to my choice of quick, convenient comfort food since I always end up with some version of beans on toast. I let my tomato plants grow a couple weeks longer than planned and the result is this recent favorite. Inspired by Joshua McFadden’s Six Seasons, it has spiced-rubbed tomatoes, basil/walnut pesto, and quick chickpeas tossed with parsley and balsamic, all on top the gluten-free sourdough I’ve been working on all summer. (Each successive loaf is turning out nicer and nicer and it makes me so so excited)!

 

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Israeli spiced tomatoes + pesto beans on toast, serves 2
I’ve been getting a lot of questions lately about quick and simple meals, and some version of this is definitely my go-to. I usually have cooked chickpeas or other beans in the fridge ready to go, pesto in the freezer, and when I’m super lucky, fresh bread (or frozen) to round it out. When I’m feeling extra lazy // need a decent meal quick, pesto on toast with a fried egg and quick pesto-dressing tossed greens also does the trick. 

1/2 tsp. sumac
1/4 tsp. ground coriander
1/4 tsp. ground cumin
1/8 tsp. red pepper flakes
sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
1 clove garlic, minced
1 large or two small tomatoes, sliced
1 cup cooked chickpeas
1 Tbs. balsamic vinegar
a small handful of parsley and/or basil, minced
1/4-1/3 cup pesto
4 slices whole-grain ‘rustic’ bread of choice- a sturdier loaf holds up better

  1. Mix the sumac, coriander, cumin, red pepper flakes, 1/2 tsp. salt, a pinch of black pepper, and the garlic in a little dish. Slice the tomatoes and lay out on a flat baking pan or plate. Rub the spice mixture all over them and let them sit while you prep the rest, and up to an hour.
  2. In another small bowl, toss together the chickpeas, vinegar, and minced herbs. Season lightly with salt and black pepper, taste and adjust the seasoning.
  3. To serve, toast the bread, warm the pesto, and then top the toast with pesto, tomato slices, and the chickpeas.