Tag Archives: The Recipe Redux

Raw Carrot Cake, for a birthday

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Dropping in super quick on this mid-summer day. The weather around here is finally reaching its appropriate (hot and summery) temperature  and The Recipe Redux is celebrating a birthday. I think you all know I prefer to celebrate birthdays with carrots, in the form of cake, so we’re going to be enjoying this weather-appropriate tiny Raw Carrot Cake.

It is tiny because I decided to make a little one to serve four to six and as you may know, raw desserts can pack a lot of nutrition in dense little (tasty!) bites. Savor them slowly and they are so worth it.

 

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Raw Carrot Cake, serves 4-6
I’ve been experimenting with this recipe for quite some time and nearly made it for my own birthday in lieu of a baked carrot cake. It’s super easy and can be made in any pan or container. If you’re going with a single layer, a 4×4 inch size would be best, or double the recipe for a crowd and it will fit easily into an 8×8. Otherwise, find your tiny flat-bottomed container of choice and layer it up, as I did. A couple more notes on ingredients: I tried a variety of flour ratios and really prefer a good base of oats as I don’t enjoy all nuts but this can be made with all almond flour to equal 1 cup in total. The addition of orange zest or essential oil in the cake and frosting is completely optional but brings a really nice flavor to finish so use only if you prefer or have on hand. 

Cake:
1/2 cup medjool dates, soaked for a few minutes
splash of water from soaked dates
1 1/2 tsp. pure vanilla extract
3/4 cup oats, finely ground
1/4 cup almond flour
1/2 tsp. ground cinnamon
1/4 tsp. ground ginger
1/8 tsp. ground nutmeg
pinch of sea salt
1/2 cup finely grated carrots
zest of 1/4 of an orange, optional

Frosting:
1/2 cups raw cashews, soaked for at least 4 hours
2-3 Tbs. reserved date water, as needed
1/2 Tbs. brown rice syrup or honey
1 Tbs. fresh lemon juice
3/4 tsp. vanilla extract
pinch of sea salt
1/2 Tbs. melted coconut oil
zest of 1/8 an orange or one drop orange essential oil

  • Line two circular pans of choice or a 4-inch square dish with parchment paper, leaving some of the paper to come up the sides, and set aside.
  • In a food processor, puree the oats until they come into a fine flour. Then transfer them to a small bowl and pulse the dates in the processor with a splash or two of their soaking liquid until they come into a chunky paste. Add the vanilla and puree a little longer until almost smooth. Add the grated carrots and pulse a few more times so they are broken down a bit more but not completely smooth. Scrape the mixture into the bowl with the oats. Add the almond flour, spices, salt, and orange zest if using. Mix it with a spatula or spoon until evenly mixed. Then, press this cake mixture into the parchment lined pans. Cover and place in the fridge until ready to frost.
  • For the frosting, in your food processor again, combine the soaked and drained cashews, 1-2 Tbs. reserved date water, brown rice syrup or honey, lemon juice, vanilla and salt. Blend on high until you have a smooth and creamy consistency. Then drizzle in the melted coconut oil and drop of orange oil or zest and puree again, adding a little more date water as needed if it’s really thick. Scrape into a bowl, cover, and chill for about an hour to firm it up.
  • To finish, lift the cake layers from their container, and frost using as much of the cashew frosting as you prefer. Leftovers will keep covered in the fridge for about 5 days.

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Rhubarb + Ginger Shrub (Drinking Vinegar)

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It is Recipe Redux time again(!) This month’s theme is Cocktails and Mocktails for May Celebrations. Since showers and celebrations with friends abound this time of year, we were challenged to share our healthy, colorful drink concoctions for festivities like bridal showers and graduation celebrations.

Generally, due to having a slightly finicky relationship with both alcohol and drinking my calories, I’m more in favor of drinking water, lemon water, or (hot, unsweetened) tea for most occasions. It is why I share few drinks here. Occasionally however, I enjoy a nice glass of something special at social events. Cider, wine, or slightly sweet and vinegary lemon ginger kombucha are then my go-to special occasion drinks.

 

 

Aside from those options, have you heard of drinking vinegars/shrubs? They are a quite old way to preserve seasonal fruits–and then drink them with or without alcohol. Shrubs have become quite popular in recent years as a flavor add-in to mixed beverages at nicer restaurants and drinking establishments, and when I first discovered them a few years ago, I went through a short phase of experimenting with vinegary blackberry, pomegranate, and orange concoctions. And then I forgot all about them.

We experimented with many traditional folk methods of using herbs last term in my herbal pharmacy class and the base recipe for a fruit + herbal shrub was the showcase during one week, so I went with the old-time method of reaching for the flavors of the season. What resulted was this rhubarb + ginger shrub which has equal hints of rhubarb, ginger, and vinegar, and is very mildly sweetened up with honey. I prefer the very plain jane method of enjoying just a splash of it in a glass of ice water, but it is often added to sparkling water, and in various ways to enhance cocktails.

 

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Rhubarb + Ginger Shrub (Drinking Vinegar)
The amount of ingredients here are part of the base recipe for fruit and herb shrubs, so if you’d like to experiment with other flavor combinations, choose any other fruits and herbs/spices to use in the same amounts. There are also several methods of macerating the fruit, which will yield slightly different flavor profiles. Here is a good video, if you’re interesting in exploring. 

1 cup chopped rhubarb
2 Tbs. freshly grated or minced ginger
1 cup apple cider vinegar
1/4 cup raw honey or maple syrup

  • Add the chopped rhubarb and ginger to a clean pint jar. Add vinegar and honey and stir well.
  • Put a small square of parchment paper over the top of the jar and then cap the lid. The parchment will prevent the vinegar from breaking down the metal of the lid.
  • Let the jar macerate (infuse) in the fridge for one week. Try to shake up the jar about once a day for a better infusion.
  • After at least a week, strain the rhubarb and ginger from the vinegar mixture using a fine mesh strainer. Press out as much of the liquid as possible. If you have cheesecloth, putting a square of it over the strainer and then squeezing the rhubarb in your hands in the cheesecloth ball to finish straining will help get all the liquid out.
  • Then use right away or pour the liquids back into the jar and store in the fridge for up to a couple months.

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Healing Mineral Broth

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In honor of Earth Day, the Recipe Redux challenged us to show how we reduce food waste. Whatever you would normally toss, use it up. Share tips for reducing food waste in meal planning, prep, or using up scraps. 

One of the things I was most excited about when we bought our house was finally having the ability to compost because I hated having to put all my vegetable scraps in the trash. But I am also the least responsible compost-keeper. I have a one-two pile system going in the last owner’s dog run that I never turn, don’t add enough green to brown material to, and sometimes draw in little rodent creatures, as I’ve created their ideal habitat. It is fairly routine for William to remind me about how I need to turn/do something about my scrap piles and for me to nod along, I know, and then do nothing about it. This is definitely the case of liking the idea of something more than the actual process, and is just one more reason I would have made a terrible farmer.

Thanks in part to learning the benefits of making healing vegetable broth last fall in my cooking class, I’ve slightly reduced my critter-habitat production, as I’ve found another initial use for many of my scraps. But also, our neighborhood cat has now got my back. ;)

The recipe we learned was Rebecca Katz’s Magic Mineral Broth, which she designed to include vegetables that will provide minerals essential for their deep-healing effects. I’ve been given the recommendation time again this past winter to incorporate more broth, as I’ve needed to return to more specific gut-healing and immune-enhancing protocols than just eating my vegetables. Mineral broth is good for that but it is also rich in electrolytes needed for athletic recovery, nutrients essential for bone health, and lots of minerals that just about all of us could use more of.

What’s more, it can be made using vegetable scraps. Lately, that is what I’ve been doing, as I throw the kale, collard, and tough broccoli stalks in the freezer, along with onion, garlic, celery, and carrot bits and pieces until I’ve gotten a good-sized bag. Then I dump it all out into a large pot, add a few good additions along with water, and simmer away for a couple hours.

In addition to making sure my broth includes onions, garlic, or leeks, I always add a good pinch or small handful of kelp or one of its varieties. These are seaweeds that are themselves extremely rich in nutrients, but also add a real umami flavor that enhances the taste. And no, the finished broth does not have a seaweed/seawater flavor.

For more about the specific reasons vegetable broth can be so healing, check out these informative articles by Ally, Aimee and The Salt.

 

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Healing Mineral Broth, makes about 10 cups
The broth above is a deep purple because of the addition of purple carrot scraps. Use what you have, but tend for vegetables that will impart a mild flavor (less beets and nightshades, more onions, brassicas, celery, and carrots). Mushrooms would be lovely as well. Add the finished broth to soups, stews, instead of water in cooking grains, or simply for sipping on its own. It is tasty, I promise. 

8-10 cups assorted vegetable scraps
1-2 bay leaves
1-2 cloves garlic, peeled
1/2 tsp. dried thyme leaves or 2-3 sprigs fresh
A small handful of parsley stems
1 tsp. whole black peppercorns
a good couple pinches of kelp (I’m currently using wakame)
10-12 cups water

  • Add all ingredients to a large pot and bring to a strong simmer. Turn down, cover, and simmer for 2-4 hours, adding water if needed.
  • Remove from heat, allow to cool slightly, and then strain off the scraps (and compost if you can).
  • Store any broth that won’t be used within a couple days in glass jars in the freezer.

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