Category Archives: Nutrition + Health

Creamy Fennel Soup with Honey + Thyme

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Near the end of my spring term, my biochemistry professor began a week on both an uplifting and cynical note: he encouraged us not to stress about the class or final too much and then relayed the stark truth that we never know what the next day will bring and we should make the most of enjoying the present. I could tell from the weeks previous that something was happening in his personal life that was challenging, and though he shared only a hint beyond that particular day, his words really stirred me.

 

I’ve shared only a little of it here, but in the past couple years I’ve been going through somewhat of a personal growing up/life upheaval. Above all, I guess I’m slowly learning to simplify and downsize what I accomplish in a day and opt for a little less stress and “striving to.” I’m also working on letting go of a manic hold on the future and just let it happen. My mantra of High Intention, Low Attachment, one I learned from a Running on Om podcast, is one I have to remind myself daily. In the spare moments I have now, I’ve been trying to take it all in with all my senses: the colors, the scents, the sounds, and yes, the flavors.

 

I can for sure say I fail as much as I succeed, but I think it’s a growing up kind of pursuit that I need in the way that only big life challenges can ask of us.

 

One way I’ve been achieving more of living in the moment is by moving many meals outside. The other is by working with the freshest produce, whether it’s from our own garden, harvested right before dinner, or from local farms. We are truly spoiled in this season and getting to walk outside and harvest a basket of something different each day has me being reminded that being able to do so was both a major priority for William and I, and that we are so privileged to do so. It is a privilege I do not take for granted.

 

Wherever you’re at in this season within the grand scheme of things, whether everything is wonderful or larger struggles have come your way, I hope you take a little moment to stop and look around, and find simple joy in the process.

 

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Creamy Fennel Soup with Honey + Thyme, serves 4-5
Soup might seem an ironic thing to eat in this warm season, but energetically, it is helpful to our bodies to be heated mildly so we can use our internal thermostat to self-regulate back to a comfortable state. It is much less harsh and draining than eating very cold foods, like ice cream or large helpings of cold melon, to cool down quickly. For this reason I think, I tend to favor light soups more in the summer than in other seasons. This one, with its emphasis on fennel, is quite light and simple. The flavor of the fennel really shines through, and there is just a sweet hint of the honey and thyme with each bite. You’ll want to serve it as starter or on days when only a light meal is preferred. As I note in the directions, taste and adjust flavors at the end. Depending on preference, you might want to add more or less salt, honey, lemon, or even cashew butter. 

1/2 tsp. coconut oil
1 large yellow onion, diced
2 celery stalks, diced
3 large fennel bulbs, diced
1 tsp. dried thyme
2 cloves garlic, minced
4 cups vegetable broth or water
3/4 cup cooked white beans or garbanzos
1 tsp. salt + more to taste
1/4 tsp. freshly ground black pepper
juice from 1/2 a lemon
2 Tbs. cashew butter
2 tsp. honey

  • Melt the oil over a medium heat in a large pot. Add in the diced onions, celery, fennel, and thyme. Cover the pot and cook for 15 minutes, until the vegetables have softened but haven’t yet browned. Add a splash or two of water as needed.
  • Add in the garlic and cook, uncovered, for about a minute more. Add in the beans, then pour in the broth or water. Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat and simmer for 20-30 minutes.
  • When the soup is done simmering, pour it into a blender in batches, to bring it to a smooth puree. On the last batch, spoon in the cashew butter and puree in.
  • Add all the now pureed soup back into the pot and then bring up to a simmer again. Add the lemon juice, salt and black pepper, and honey. Taste to check for seasoning and adjust as needed. You might find it needs more salt, pepper, lemon juice, or honey. Add a small amount of whatever it needs until it tastes balance and “right.” You’ll know and it will be lovely.
  • Ladle into bowls, and serve with warm bread as desired.

Raw Carrot Cake, for a birthday

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Dropping in super quick on this mid-summer day. The weather around here is finally reaching its appropriate (hot and summery) temperature  and The Recipe Redux is celebrating a birthday. I think you all know I prefer to celebrate birthdays with carrots, in the form of cake, so we’re going to be enjoying this weather-appropriate tiny Raw Carrot Cake.

It is tiny because I decided to make a little one to serve four to six and as you may know, raw desserts can pack a lot of nutrition in dense little (tasty!) bites. Savor them slowly and they are so worth it.

 

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Raw Carrot Cake, serves 4-6
I’ve been experimenting with this recipe for quite some time and nearly made it for my own birthday in lieu of a baked carrot cake. It’s super easy and can be made in any pan or container. If you’re going with a single layer, a 4×4 inch size would be best, or double the recipe for a crowd and it will fit easily into an 8×8. Otherwise, find your tiny flat-bottomed container of choice and layer it up, as I did. A couple more notes on ingredients: I tried a variety of flour ratios and really prefer a good base of oats as I don’t enjoy all nuts but this can be made with all almond flour to equal 1 cup in total. The addition of orange zest or essential oil in the cake and frosting is completely optional but brings a really nice flavor to finish so use only if you prefer or have on hand. 

Cake:
1/2 cup medjool dates, soaked for a few minutes
splash of water from soaked dates
1 1/2 tsp. pure vanilla extract
3/4 cup oats, finely ground
1/4 cup almond flour
1/2 tsp. ground cinnamon
1/4 tsp. ground ginger
1/8 tsp. ground nutmeg
pinch of sea salt
1/2 cup finely grated carrots
zest of 1/4 of an orange, optional

Frosting:
1/2 cups raw cashews, soaked for at least 4 hours
2-3 Tbs. reserved date water, as needed
1/2 Tbs. brown rice syrup or honey
1 Tbs. fresh lemon juice
3/4 tsp. vanilla extract
pinch of sea salt
1/2 Tbs. melted coconut oil
zest of 1/8 an orange or one drop orange essential oil

  • Line two circular pans of choice or a 4-inch square dish with parchment paper, leaving some of the paper to come up the sides, and set aside.
  • In a food processor, puree the oats until they come into a fine flour. Then transfer them to a small bowl and pulse the dates in the processor with a splash or two of their soaking liquid until they come into a chunky paste. Add the vanilla and puree a little longer until almost smooth. Add the grated carrots and pulse a few more times so they are broken down a bit more but not completely smooth. Scrape the mixture into the bowl with the oats. Add the almond flour, spices, salt, and orange zest if using. Mix it with a spatula or spoon until evenly mixed. Then, press this cake mixture into the parchment lined pans. Cover and place in the fridge until ready to frost.
  • For the frosting, in your food processor again, combine the soaked and drained cashews, 1-2 Tbs. reserved date water, brown rice syrup or honey, lemon juice, vanilla and salt. Blend on high until you have a smooth and creamy consistency. Then drizzle in the melted coconut oil and drop of orange oil or zest and puree again, adding a little more date water as needed if it’s really thick. Scrape into a bowl, cover, and chill for about an hour to firm it up.
  • To finish, lift the cake layers from their container, and frost using as much of the cashew frosting as you prefer. Leftovers will keep covered in the fridge for about 5 days.

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Strawberry Tabbouleh Salad + an early summer catch up

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It has been a while since I rounded up all the inspirations that are lifting me and the last couple of months, there has been much. I enjoy going back and reading my previous posts of these types, so in the off-chance you’ll enjoy any of these as much as I have, I’m bringing them to you here.

Otherwise, this strawberry tabbouleh salad is so absolutely delicious that I’m going to make it on repeat until the strawberries slow down. It just might be my new favorite spring meal.


Reading
:
Tender: a cook and his vegetable patch

Iron and the Female Athlete: This review article was an assigned reading from my micronutrients class this term. I am learning so much and I really appreciated delving more into the research on select micronutrients that I (and many others) struggle with.

When Times Are Tough

Sick, Again: This perspective on living with an invisible and life-changing disease is one I resonate with. I love how Tessa was able to write about her experience and ultimately perspective on living with Crohn’s Disease.

The Power of a Letter: I’ve been saving this story about Obama’s mailroom for months. Just thinking about it lifts me up when the politics/media cloud threatens to take over.

Listening To:
Let it Out Podcast with Jessamyn Olivia Stanley and my one of my favorite ladies in food, Sarah Britton.

Connie Chapman’s Podcast about Ditching the Victim mentality (ep #69): Find Someone to Call You Out on Your Bullshit.(!)

The Rich Roll Podcast with John Mackey: Whole Foods Market opened in our city about eight months ago and I still haven’t been as I try to shop at the locally owned natural foods stores as much as I can. I didn’t expect to enjoy so much of this episode, especially Whole Foods’ founder John Mackey’s perspective on business.

And also, the episode with David Clark. I think I listened to this one about four times over in the space of three days this last week.

Self Care:
Inspiration from Claire

Self Care, Two Ways

Let it Out: I bought this journaling book last year, also authored by Let It Out podcast host, Katie Dalebout. I’ve been returning to its helpful prompts lately as there is so much good stuff here.

Into the Woods: I’ve followed Aran’s beautiful blog, Cannelle et Vanille, for as long as I knew food blogs existed. I love that she shared this video of her experience with food, as a therapy to heal and where she was able to find community and connection. So much of this resonates with my experience.

Lastly, Pia’s beautiful wisdom on a postcard from my younger self:
Ten years on again, as I look back at my younger self…I remember asking myself at the time, when everything seemed so chaotic in my life… Would I be bold enough to pursue my own dreams? To live away from my family? To live differently to my family? Will I be ok when my mother dies? Will I become a mother?
Trust. Because, yes. I need to remember this every time I ask myself heart questions in times of messiness and chaos. “Trust. Because, yes.” 

 

Strawberry Millet Tabbouleh, serves 3-5
I am a big fan of combining cooked grains, beans, and whatever seasonal vegetables are on hand to make main-dish style salads that can also double as potluck or celebratory sides. This salad, though a complete deviation from the traditional middle eastern tabbouleh, was a recent favorite in our house. The addition of strawberries really takes it to the next level.

1 cup millet
¾ teaspoon cinnamon
½ teaspoon each cumin and coriander
2 cups water
3-4 green onions
1 pint strawberries
½ a bunch of radishes
2 cups cooked lima beans
A small handful of mint leaves, finely minced
A slightly larger handful of flat-leaf parsley, finely minced
¼ cup extra virgin olive oil
1-2 tablespoons red wine vinegar
Juice from one small lemon
½ to ¾ teaspoon sea salt and black pepper
1/4 cup dukkah seasoning, as desired

  1. Place the millet in a small saucepan and then add the spices and 2 cups water. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat to low, and then cover. Cook for 15-20 minutes until the water is absorbed, and then set aside to cool slightly.
  2. Thinly slice the green onions, strawberries, and radishes and add them to a large mixing bowl. Then add the cooked and cooled millet, beans, mint, parsley, oil, vinegar, lemon juice, and salt and pepper. Taste as you go and adjust seasonings as needed. Top with dukkah seasoning if desired.
  3. Serve chilled or at room temperature.

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